Learning from the past: Why Black British history should be taught in schools.

A blog post by LTAR member Katy Morrison I was taught very little about Black British history either at school or university. I do not think there was a single Black British author among the set texts on my English Literature course. I am white and I grew up in mostly white, middle-class neighbourhoods, so …

Layers

  A post by LTAR member Nicola Kitchen.This is a true incident.  I wanted to try and get across how a mundane event of two people passing each other and stopping to talk - which is totally normal in the countryside - has so much else going on when race is involved in the world …

Who am I

  A post by LTAR member Beth Collins Who am I to say I own this culture more than you. Who am I to say I belong and you do not. I am no-one in particular. I am an accident of birth, a phenomenon of random genetics that gave me the skin I have, the …

Free Siyanda!

Siyanda Mngaza is currently serving a four and a half year prison sentence for defending herself against a racially motivated hate crime. Siyanda worked for South Wales Fire Service in HR – recruiting fire fighters. She had never been in trouble before. In May 2019 at a camping site in Brecon, she was attacked without …

Scars

A post by LTAR member Sunny Sian. Scars  Scarred knuckles Scarred face Battles won Battles lost Some seen Some unseen All... felt   Why do they call me names in the playground? Why wont the teachers don’t do anything? Finding solace in the dinner ladies  Taken under a shielding wing Wings of safety Wings of …

Twice as Hard, Half as Far

A post by LTAR member Hilda Wright Hard work should be expected in order to achieve, particularly great things, but when it’s you working twice as hard as everybody else, just to achieve the minimum, then grave questions must be asked. My parents (In their thick Nigerian vernacular) broke the utopian doctrine that I engendered, …